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Commonly Asked Questions

Friday, Jul 08,2016


How long should crown sensitivity last? <br><br>
New crown sensitivity can vary from person-to-person, so this can be a difficult question to answer unless you go to the source that knows best—the dentist who placed your crown. And prior to going to your appointment, it is helpful if you have identified as many of the facts and/or triggers for any symptoms you have. For example, are your teeth sensitive to hot, cold, sweet, touch, pressure, or biting? It may be as simple as adjusting a minor high spot when you bite. Other questions to discuss with your dentist include the following. What was the extent of decay in the tooth prior to the crown? How close to the pulp (that contains the nerve) was the decay? Some sensitivity is normal after a crown as the tooth settles down; however, increasing sensitivity or pain after a week or more warrants a follow up visit to your dentist.
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Chipped tooth – big deal or no deal?<br><br>
Dentists are frequently asked questions about chipping a tooth—“Is it that big a deal? Doesn’t it depend on how big the chip is? I mean if it is just a little chip, it can’t be that bad…can it?” The answers to these questions are variations of the same theme. Yes, chipping a tooth means you have lost valuable tooth structure and potentially laid the foundation for additional chips and cracks. Or you may need a root canal if the chip is close to the pulp containing the nerve and it doesn’t heal properly from the trauma. As for repairing a chipped tooth, your dentist can usually fix minor chips with modern bonding techniques using tooth-colored filling materials. For larger chips that involve more tooth structure, your dentist may suggest a crown (cap) or a veneer. The most important thing to remember is that if you chip a tooth, you need to see a dental professional for a proper evaluation and treatment remedy

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